Author experiences, Embracing Creativity, Fiction, History and culture, Writing Tips

My Mother’s Blessing To Be A Writer — Women Writers, Women’s Books

This is a re-post from the excellent Women Writers, Women’s Books website… Wonderfully written and, I believe, many writers and artists can relate.

It’s been eleven years since my mother passed away, eleven years since I last heard her voice. She was sixty-three years old, unquestionably too young. After she died, I began paying attention to the experiences friends had with similar losses. Some of them spoke of messages they believed their loved ones had sent – birds…

via My Mother’s Blessing To Be A Writer — Women Writers, Women’s Books

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Embracing Creativity, History and culture, Magazines

Just in time for Halloween!

My friend and I have published an online magazine called Ghost! We both love ghost stories and all things creepy and paranormal, so it only made sense that we’d turn that passion into a magazine!

Please check it out – we’re charging $2, which is not too steep!

Author experiences, Nonfiction, Writing Tips

Why I Read and Write about Illness Catherine Lanser — via Women Writers, Women’s Books

This is a re-post of an excellent article about how illness can affect you in so many different, unexpected ways…

The thought of a hospital scares some people. Some people think hospital cafeteria food is awful. Some people expect to read a whole book without any bodily fluids making an appearance. I am not one of these people. I love the hospital, the food, and those free little booties they give you. I have had…

via Why I Read and Write about Illness Catherine Lanser — Women Writers, Women’s Books

politics

Are you marching?

Hundreds of marches are going on next Saturday. Check the website mentioned below if you are interested in finding one near you…

is March For Our Lives! Join the movement for change in Washington or your local community (or internationally). I will be joining in from Brussels. Follow the link to find out what your community has planned. https://marchforourlives.com/

via MARCH 24th! — ellisnelson

Nonfiction, podcasts, politics

Highway of Tears

I’m listening to another CBC podcast: “Missing and Murdered: Who Killed Alberta Williams?” Reporter Connie Walker investigates the 1989 unsolved murder of a young indigenous woman. Alberta Williams was found along Highway 16 in British Columbia, now known as the Highway of Tears because of the number of women (mainly indigenous) who have been murdered or went missing along the highway.

As she interviews people who knew Alberta, Connie Walker peels back the layers of a terrible past that may be unknown to many non-Canadians.

From the 1880s until as late as 1996 (!!!), the Canadian government operated “residential schools,” or boarding schools for indigenous people. Children as young as 6 were forcibly removed from their homes and taken from their families to spend years in cruel institutions where they faced sexual abuse, forced starvation, and even death. Their hair was cut, and they were not allowed to speak their ancestral languages.

The legacy of residential schools continues today, passed down by grandparents and parents who were treated less than human. Alcoholism, PTSD, poverty, domestic violence, and feelings of worthlessness are remnants of the residential school system.

I just finished listening to Episode 3, where Connie Walkers begins to connect the past with the present — why are indigenous women  3 to 4 times more likely to be murdered than non-Indigenous Canadian women? Unlike all the other podcasts I’ve listened to, Walkers draws from her own childhood experiences and links the culture to the crime.

Walker’s approach underlines how no crime stands by itself. We are all products of our upbringing, history, and society. And it reminds me how every country has its shameful past — the U.S. being no different — that affects its citizens for generations.

Book Reviews, Nonfiction, politics

Born a Crime…

This is a re-post of a re-post! Looks very interesting!

Originally posted on What’s Nonfiction?: Book review: Born a Crime, by Trevor Noah Where most children are proof of their parents’ love, I was the proof of their criminality. Apartheid is one of those subjects that I know embarrassingly little about beyond the basics. If you’re in the same position, I highly recommend comedian…

via South African Roots and Apartheid’s Influence, with a Sense of Humor — Memoir Notes

politics

Show your love

If you follow U.S. elections, you know that Democrat Doug Jones won the Senate seat in Alabama yesterday, largely due to the turnout of Black voters. CNN reported that 98% of Black women and more than 90% of Black men voted for Jones.

Kamala Harris (right) at a rally for the Affordable Care Act, June 2017.

So, why did college-educated white women (and men!) mostly vote for Republican candidate Roy Moore? Moore has been accused of sexual encounters with teenage girls and has romanticized the times before slavery was abolished.

If you are a women, know a woman, or have any female members of your family, it does not make sense to support Moore. If you are in favor of Black people having equal rights, it does not make sense to support Moore. What is the explanation for his popularity among the majority of white Alabama voters?

  1. Many educated white women and men still believe it is okay for men to sexually assault girls and women.
  2. Many educated white women and men still believe it is okay to discriminate against Black people.

As a friend on Twitter said last night, while the election results were being reported,  “Privilege is a powerful drug.”

If you are reading this and you are a white person, thinking, “But I’m not like that!” then take concrete steps to disprove the statistics. Support organizations, businesses, and political candidates who stand for values that support all people, regardless of race or gender.

Sign that reads, "Green jobs not jails."
Photo courtesy of Brooke Anderson at https://www.flickr.com/photos/brooke_anderson/773438823

Here’s a list to get you started: