Author experiences, Book Marketing, Book Reviews, Bookstores

The Importance of Informative Book Reviews — Southern Writers – Suite T

Below is a re-post from the excellent Southern Writers blog. Do you read reviews before buying a book? More importantly, do you leave reviews for books you like/dislike? If I’m online, I tend to scan both the good and bad reviews to get a balanced feel for a book. But what if you’re browsing in a bookstore? Sometimes the best books are ones you just stumble upon and take a leap of faith based on the back cover!

By Vicki H. Moss, Contributing Editor for Southern Writers MagazineSo many books—so many hours in one lifetime to read them. There’s no way to plow through them all. And that’s the reason book reviews are so important.I recently bought a couple of books recommended for a trip I was soon to take. Since I was going…

via The Importance of Informative Book Reviews — Southern Writers – Suite T

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Book Marketing, Education, Getting Published, Nonfiction, Writing Tips

Copyright myths…

Yesterday, I saw a commercial on TV for a “publishing company” that will publish authors’ books and “handle” all copyright issues for them. I thought, “What copyright issues”? When you put pen to paper, your creative work is automatically covered by copyright law.

If you see a publishing service that charges money to “obtain” the copyright for your work, be aware of this red flag! If you do chose to register, you can do it on your own for as little as $35. But it’s not really necessary.

The only reason you would need to register is if you decide to file a lawsuit against someone for infringing on your copyright.

And copyright has nothing to do with your ISBN. Even if you publish with Amazon or Smashwords, who assign their own numbers, your work still belongs to you. ISBNs and ASINs are ways to keep track of your books. They have nothing to do with copyright.

So, don’t get suckered by companies who charge to do services that you can easily do yourself. Check out our new book, “Make It Happen: The no-nonsense guide to publishing and marketing your ebook.” We talk more about copyright, ISBNs, and lots of other important info. you need to publish your book yourself!

Book Marketing, Conferences, Education, Getting Published, Nonfiction, Writing Tips

Freelancing in the new age…

A couple of weekends ago, Lisa and I hawked our new book Make It Happen at the Triangle Association of Freelancers (TAF) annual conference. They are such a great group! I’ve been going to the TAF conference for at least five years, and everyone is always super friendly and helpful. I’ll be posting some more about what I learned at the conference in the next week or so.

So, if you are a freelance writer in NC (or beyond), consider joining TAF. You are instantly connected with a group of experienced, professional freelance writers who are on the cutting edge of the freelance industry — they know the trends, inside and out. Plus, they are encouraging and welcoming. (And you get a really good discount at the conference!)

 

Book Marketing, Getting Published, Nonfiction, Writing Tips

Latest publication – Make It Happen!

Louisa Cover2Please check out our latest publication, Make It Happen: The no-nonsense guide to publishing and marketing your ebook! If you’re just starting on the ebook journey, or if you simply need a boost of inspiration, check out this guide. It’s short, easy-to-read, and full of tips and advice from our own treks into indie publishing!.

This is a paperback, but we hope to also offer it as an ebook in the months to come.

 

Book Marketing, Book Reviews, Fiction

Quick Reads 2018!

Good morning and happy February to everyone! I am taking some time to promote #QuickReads today as I think it is a brilliant initiative that encourages more people to pick up great books. I am always have time to help boost reading opportunities in the UK and the world. The Reading Agency has put together […]

via Quick Reads 2018 @readingagency @Quick_Reads @ed_pr #QuickReads #Giveaway #SpreadingTheWord — Always Trust In Books

Book Marketing, Bookstores

Advice from a bookshop owner…

I speak as a bookshop owner. Someone who loves books. Most of us that run bookshops do, so please bear in mind that if you want us to stock your book we theoretically, will lend a receptive ear. But here are a few tips to help make the whole submission process a bit easier. Running…

via Getting Your Book Into A Bookshop — Women Writers, Women’s Books

Book Marketing, Getting Published, Writing Tips

Improve your odds and get published!

paperback-books-background (1)For the past few years, I’ve been attending a great writers’ conference in Raleigh, NC, hosted by the Triangle Association of Freelancers called Write Now! It’s a day-long event and includes an exceptional keynote speaker, great sessions, and lunch (not to mention a raffle) — all for only $69. These people really understand the concept of the “starving artist”!

Last year, the keynote speaker at Write Now! was author David Morrell (you can see my write-up here), author of countless thrillers and a fabulous speaker. This year, Brian Klems, the online editor of WritersDigest.com, gave us all great advice to help win over literary agents. He gave us a whole list of practical tips to help stack the deck in our favor. As well as working for Writer’s Digest, Klems also edits books for a living and has had his own book published (Oh Boy, You’re Having a Girl: A Dad’s Survival Guide to Raising Daughters), so he knows a thing or two…

Here are a few of my favorite tips that Klems shared in his keynote speech and also in his workshop about “writing like a pro”:

  • Make sure your manuscript is typo-free. This sounds obvious, right? But according to Brian, spelling your character’s name three different ways and getting “they’re, their, and there” mixed up are signs to an agent that you’re unprofessional, lazy, and not in it for the long haul. Yikes!
  • Get to know agents by doing your research first. Before he started pitching his book, Klems first made a list of traits he wanted in an agent. He or she would have to have children because the book was about being a parent, the ability to purchase TV rights, represent his book’s genre, and have a similar sense of humor as Klems. He thoroughly researched three agents (THREE!!), getting to know their interests and who their clients were. The third one he queried took on his book. The moral of the story? Quality not quantity!
  • Have more than one idea. Agents love lots of ideas, Klems said. If you get the opportunity to talk to an agent or editor, make the most of it. If he or she doesn’t like your first pitch, try another. Come prepared to pitch any ideas you have when you have the chance.
  • Hire an editor to help you with your query letter. You only get one chance to impress an agent, so give the query everything you’ve got, Klems said. (Especially if you only send out three!)

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  • Be kind, useful, and network. Never badmouth an agent or author online; the publishing world isn’t that big, and who wants to work with a writer they perceive as being negative? Be useful by following agents and authors on social networks like Twitter and sharing their Tweets and other valuable information. Be an advocate for writers you admire — write positive reviews for them — and network with other writers. You may find your next beta readers, and maybe they’ll have a connection with magazines or agents.

I’ll post more great tips I learned at the conference in the next couple of weeks, so stay tuned! And feel free to share any advice you’ve learned about improving your odds of getting published.