Education, Job search

So, you majored in English… Now what?

If  you have an English degree like me (or pretty much any liberal arts degree), you have likely heard the same comments from people with “useful” degrees in computers or accounting about how hard it will be for you to find a “real” job…blah blah blah…

Maybe you don’t want to teach freshman composition or write a book. But you would like a solid paycheck and some respect. So, what do you do? All is not lost! The good news is that we English majors have lots of excellent and useful skills that can transfer into many different fields. We’re sort of like the chameleons of the professional world.

Here’s a five-step process to help you find a great job that pays actual money!

1. Find your focus. You’re jumping in the deep end. To avoid feeling overwhelmed, start with an idea of what field you’re interested in and work backwards from there. Are you interested in healthcare? Publishing? Law? Government? Would you like to work at a college or university setting?

2. Consider if you want a private sector, nonprofit, or government job. All three categories have advantages and disadvantages. Typically, jobs at private companies pay higher than nonprofit and government fields, while state and federal jobs tend to have better benefits packages and can be more stable. Nonprofit jobs can allow you to work in a field you feel passionate about — say, the environment or helping children.

3. Start a targeted search. If you know specific companies or organizations you’d like to work for (perhaps a nearby hospital is known for great benefits), start with their career pages. Otherwise, go to a job site (like monster or indeed) and do an advanced search — use keywords that represent your English major skills, like “research,” “communications,” “editing,” and “critical thinking. Add the industry you chose. For example: “healthcare writer” or “university editor.”

4. Once you get an idea of the jobs in your area, take note of job titles. Maybe you’ve been targeting universities and see that there are lots of “communications specialist” positions that match your skill set. Or you’re interested in a private sector job and “public relations” positions keep popping up at local insurance companies. Now, you can really hone in and do specific searches by job title and industry.

5. Update and “reboot” your resume to match that job title and industry. Are you applying for a creative job? One in the financial sector? Research the culture of the field and make sure your resume reflects that same style — in word choices and layout. Look at examples of others’ resumes in the same industry to make sure yours isn’t way off base. Most importantly, highlight your special ENGLISH MAJOR skills that apply directly to the job description.

If you need help, there are lots of professionals out there who can tailor your resume to help you land that job! Please check out my page on fiverr. I can “reboot” your resume to match the job you want!

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Author experiences, Book Marketing, Book Reviews, Bookstores

The Importance of Informative Book Reviews — Southern Writers – Suite T

Below is a re-post from the excellent Southern Writers blog. Do you read reviews before buying a book? More importantly, do you leave reviews for books you like/dislike? If I’m online, I tend to scan both the good and bad reviews to get a balanced feel for a book. But what if you’re browsing in a bookstore? Sometimes the best books are ones you just stumble upon and take a leap of faith based on the back cover!

By Vicki H. Moss, Contributing Editor for Southern Writers MagazineSo many books—so many hours in one lifetime to read them. There’s no way to plow through them all. And that’s the reason book reviews are so important.I recently bought a couple of books recommended for a trip I was soon to take. Since I was going…

via The Importance of Informative Book Reviews — Southern Writers – Suite T

Author experiences, Nonfiction, Writing Tips

Why I Read and Write about Illness Catherine Lanser — via Women Writers, Women’s Books

This is a re-post of an excellent article about how illness can affect you in so many different, unexpected ways…

The thought of a hospital scares some people. Some people think hospital cafeteria food is awful. Some people expect to read a whole book without any bodily fluids making an appearance. I am not one of these people. I love the hospital, the food, and those free little booties they give you. I have had…

via Why I Read and Write about Illness Catherine Lanser — Women Writers, Women’s Books

Book Marketing, Conferences, Education, Getting Published, Nonfiction, Writing Tips

Freelancing in the new age…

A couple of weekends ago, Lisa and I hawked our new book Make It Happen at the Triangle Association of Freelancers (TAF) annual conference. They are such a great group! I’ve been going to the TAF conference for at least five years, and everyone is always super friendly and helpful. I’ll be posting some more about what I learned at the conference in the next week or so.

So, if you are a freelance writer in NC (or beyond), consider joining TAF. You are instantly connected with a group of experienced, professional freelance writers who are on the cutting edge of the freelance industry — they know the trends, inside and out. Plus, they are encouraging and welcoming. (And you get a really good discount at the conference!)

 

Book Marketing, Getting Published, Nonfiction, Writing Tips

Latest publication – Make It Happen!

Louisa Cover2Please check out our latest publication, Make It Happen: The no-nonsense guide to publishing and marketing your ebook! If you’re just starting on the ebook journey, or if you simply need a boost of inspiration, check out this guide. It’s short, easy-to-read, and full of tips and advice from our own treks into indie publishing!.

This is a paperback, but we hope to also offer it as an ebook in the months to come.

 

politics

Are you marching?

Hundreds of marches are going on next Saturday. Check the website mentioned below if you are interested in finding one near you…

is March For Our Lives! Join the movement for change in Washington or your local community (or internationally). I will be joining in from Brussels. Follow the link to find out what your community has planned. https://marchforourlives.com/

via MARCH 24th! — ellisnelson

politics

Show your love

If you follow U.S. elections, you know that Democrat Doug Jones won the Senate seat in Alabama yesterday, largely due to the turnout of Black voters. CNN reported that 98% of Black women and more than 90% of Black men voted for Jones.

Kamala Harris (right) at a rally for the Affordable Care Act, June 2017.

So, why did college-educated white women (and men!) mostly vote for Republican candidate Roy Moore? Moore has been accused of sexual encounters with teenage girls and has romanticized the times before slavery was abolished.

If you are a women, know a woman, or have any female members of your family, it does not make sense to support Moore. If you are in favor of Black people having equal rights, it does not make sense to support Moore. What is the explanation for his popularity among the majority of white Alabama voters?

  1. Many educated white women and men still believe it is okay for men to sexually assault girls and women.
  2. Many educated white women and men still believe it is okay to discriminate against Black people.

As a friend on Twitter said last night, while the election results were being reported,  “Privilege is a powerful drug.”

If you are reading this and you are a white person, thinking, “But I’m not like that!” then take concrete steps to disprove the statistics. Support organizations, businesses, and political candidates who stand for values that support all people, regardless of race or gender.

Sign that reads, "Green jobs not jails."
Photo courtesy of Brooke Anderson at https://www.flickr.com/photos/brooke_anderson/773438823

Here’s a list to get you started: